"BUILDING ETERNAL RELATIONSHIPS THROUGH SMALL GROUPS"

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SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

A social enterprise is an organization that applies commercial strategies to maximize improvements in human and environmental well-being, rather than maximizing profits for external shareholders. Social enterprises can be structured as a for-profit or non-profit, and may take the form of a co-operative, mutual organization, a social business, or a charity organization. (See Definitions below)

Reprint From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. "Social Enterprise is a relative new concept in the Christian Communities. However it is a relabeling of how a non-profit organization or charitable organization sustains itself to accomplish its purpose and goals."

To understand SCC's role is simply providing the 501c3 capability to organizations and information for the leadership to build a sustainable system to accomplish their purpose and goals.

To Get instructions for Social Enterprise Affiliation click HERE

To apply to become a Social Enterprise non profit affiliate down load our Application HERE

Definitions:

These Definitions are From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For Profit - Profit is the difference between the purchase and the component costs of delivered goods and/or services and any operating or other expenses.

A Nonprofit organization (US and UK), or not-for-profit organization (UK and elsewhere), often called an NPO or simply a nonprofit, is an organization that uses surplus revenues to achieve its goals rather than distributing them as profit or dividends. States in the United States defer to the IRS designation conferred under United States Internal Revenue Code Section 501(c), when the IRS deems an organization eligible.

While not-for-profit organizations are permitted to generate surplus revenues, they must be retained by the organization for its self-preservation, expansion, or plans. NPOs have controlling members or boards. Many have paid staff including management, while others employ unpaid volunteers and even executives who work with or without compensation (occasionally nominal). Where there is a token fee, in general, it is used to meet legal requirements for establishing a contract between the executive and the organization.

A cooperative ("coop"), co-operative ("co-op"), or coöperative ("coöp") is an autonomous association of persons who voluntarily cooperate for their mutual social, economic, and cultural benefit.[1] Cooperatives include non-profit community organizations and businesses that are owned and managed by the people who use its services (a consumer cooperative) and/or by the people who work there (a worker cooperative) or by the people who live there (a housing cooperative).

 A mutual, mutual organization, or mutual society is an organization (which is often, but not always, a company or business) based on the principle of mutuality. Unlike a true cooperative, members usually do not contribute to the capital of the company by direct investment, but derive their right to profits and votes through their customer relationship. A mutual organization or society is often simply referred to as a mutual.

A mutual exists with the purpose of raising funds from its membership or customers (collectively called its members), which can then be used to provide common services to all members of the organization or society. A mutual is therefore owned by, and run for the benefit of, its members - it has no external shareholders to pay in the form of dividends, and as such does not usually seek to maximize and make large profits or capital gains. Mutuals exist for the members to benefit from the services they provide and often do not pay income tax.

Profits made will usually be re-invested in the mutual for the benefit of the members, although some profit may also be necessary in the case of mutuals for internal financing to sustain or grow the organization, and to make sure it remains safe and secure.

Social Enterprise - Social business, as the term is commonly used, was first defined by Nobel Peace Prize laureate Prof. Muhammad Yunus and is described in his books Creating a world without poverty—Social Business and the future of capitalism and Building Social Business—The new kind of capitalism that serves humanity's most pressing needs. A number of organizations with which he is involved actively promote and incubate social businesses. These include the Yunus Centre in Bangladesh, the Yunus Social Business - Global Initiatives in Germany, the Yunus Social Business Centre University of Florence, the Grameen Creative Lab in Germany, and Social Business Earth.

In Yunus' definition, a social business is a non-loss, non-dividend company designed to address a social objective within the highly regulated marketplace of today. It is distinct from a non-profit because the business should seek to generate a modest profit but this will be used to expand the company’s reach, improve the product or service or in other ways to subsidize the social mission.

In fact a wider definition of social business is possible, including any business which has a social rather than financial objective.

A charitable organization is a type of non-profit organization (NPO). It differs from other types of NPOs in that it centers on non-profit and philanthropic goals as well as social well-being (e.g. charitable, educational, religious, or other activities serving the public interest or common good).

The legal definition of charitable organization (and of Charity) varies according to the country and in some instances the region of the country in which the charitable organization operates. The regulation, tax treatment, and the way in which charity law affects charitable organizations also varies.

Financial figures (e.g. tax refund, revenue from fundraising, revenue from sale of goods and services or revenue from investment) are important indicators to assess the financial sustainability of a charity. This kind of information directly impacts the charity because donors often look at both the objective and financial indicators in order to decide whether to donate to a non-profit organization. Thus, to fulfill commitments toward the society might help the charity receive a better reputation as well as a higher standing in the community. The fact that the charity becomes more attractive would bring it more financial gains.